Tag Archive for garden

Garden Glory-Pears!

This week my Little Sprouts and I harvested 21 pounds of food.  Our pear tree has fire blight and is dying and we didn’t see any pears on it this year.  Sad, because we usually harvest over 250 pounds of pears.  To our surprise there were a handful of pears ripe on the tree this week, hiding from us and the ornery raccoons that usually help themselves to much of our fruit. 

harvesting watermelon with kids

We also picked this lovely 13 pound watermelon this week.

harvesting veggies with kids

The kids have so much fun in the garden exploring and finding treats.  I cannot remember what our life was like before we had all this great learning and exploration we enjoy in the garden.

picking radishes with kids

ladybug in the garden

Here the kids discovered a cute little ladybug crawling up the okra.

The days are cooling and the getting shorter so the time for the garden is coming to a close, but the garden has birthed so much awe and wonder for us this year.  I can’t wait until Spring!  I love cold weather and winter, but I’m going to miss all the fun we have watching amazing things grow.  Is anything still growing around you?


 

How We Built the Expansion

This is a very long post, but if you are interested in how we were able to expand, the information is here.

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The minute my husband told me our generous neighbor was going to allow us to grow whatever we wanted, my mind started spinning one hundred miles an hour. This could really help us reach our goal of growing a lot of our own food. Consider food for a family of 10, since I have 7 extra kids here for 15 meals a week. The kids and I dreamed of all the things we could try and things we didn’t have room for now, like corn! Yummm! One thing I was interested in was growing more perennials like garlic, or crops like potatoes that you harvest all at once so we would be able to manage what we were growing.
Right now we are doing fine, except we are NOT managing the weeds AT ALL! But we aren’t giving up on that. It is tempting to go get a giant bottle of round up but I just cannot do that to the earth KNOWING that roundup is showing up in people’s blood supply now.
Anyway, back to the subject. The first thing I did was call my DHS licensing worker to see what parameters I would need to follow. She told me I needed to have it fenced in and I would have to be able to bring all the kids in, close the gate, work in there, and bring all the kids out. Even the big kids can’t go into the garden without me. OK. Then I needed a sturdy 4 foot fence with no holes the kids could climb through. OK. So, no, I can’t use the barbed wire that is already there? NO! OK. (I was just kidding of course) That’s not so hard, fencing in whatever space I want to use. But oh, we don’t have any money. Ok, Facebook, who has some old fence laying around? We had to consider that some of the area next to our house holds A LOT of water for most of the spring, and we needed easy access from our back yard or our front yard. We needed to leave space for a vehicle to drive through so the owner could get his tractor through there or his truck or whatever he wanted. The part of the space next to our house is very long and narrow, so the garden was going to be long and narrow. I measured off what I thought was the most I could take care of. I made a spreadsheet and penciled in what beds I thought would fit. I wanted to put narrow beds on the fence line so I could use it for trellis. I thought I could build a few beds each year until I filled it. The area from the front of my front yard to the gate in the back yard garden was about 80 feet, and we could go 20 feet wide and fit in 2 foot and 3 foot wide beds and still leave space on the side for vehicles. So we decided to do 80 x 20. According to my spreadsheet we could fit 40 beds ranging in size from 2 x 2 to 3 x 10 and a few containers. Originally my plan was for all of the beds to be 10 feet long and either 2 feet wide up against the fence, or 3 feet wide in the center with one 4 x 4 as part of the center feature and place to rest.

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I posted on Facebook and my husband started talking to people at work about our idea. He had a friend who was cleaning up his yard and had a bunch of old wood and chain link he was taking to the dump the following day. Bring it on over. As I mentioned before there was some barbed wire fencing on the space, most of which was laying over and broken. There was about 60 feet along one side that was still standing. We removed all of the wire and wound it up so our neighbor could scrap it with other metal, and we set to work on getting the t-posts out of the ground. We waited until a good rain and went out and worked them out of the ground. We also found a few posts laying out around in other places and a little wire we picked up. My husband got the mower out there and mowed the grass and weeds down so we could work easier. We went to Lowe’s and bought 4 corner posts and bags of concrete. We measured the area off 20 x 80 and dug and set the four posts to mark our area. Then Mr. Kent’s friend Jason came over with his load for the dump. There was quite a bit of privacy fencing….we could cut that up and build beds out of it. There was also about 50 feet of chain link and some posts. We ran string along the four posts and banged in the t-posts we had found every 8 feet, and then we took the posts that were in the junk pile and set those in along another side every 8 feet. We used the hardware that was still on the roll of fencing and strung the back 20 feet side up with that and rolled the rest up until we could get some more chain link. We had one side of a garden!

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Next we got out our trusty old hand saw and started cutting the privacy fence panels into three slat wide pieces. They are six inch slats, so that makes them about a foot and a half tall when made into a bed. They were different lengths but mostly around 6 feet long. Our neighbor was outside and heard us sawing and came over. Do I hear a hand saw? He asked. Yes. Do you want a real saw? Yes. So he brought his saw over for us to use and it made the work much less labor intensive. Steve is always helping us out. 

We laid the panels out in sets that would build a bed and started cutting some of the panels in two foot lengths so we could make the sides. It ended up making 8-6 foot beds, 2-2 foot beds, and a giant bin to hold leaves for composting. Not bad for free!
We were short a few fence posts so we used a large piece of top bar that was in the junk pile cut into pieces to make the last posts we needed. The junk pile had 2 corner posts in it, which we used to frame the gates, and one gate. Another friend, Sherrill, saw my post on Facebook and brought us a couple of rolls of used chain link as well. We used it to string one of the long sides of the garden with some hardware that another friend, Suzanne, gave us and rolled up the rest to use with the leftover from the junk pile. We also found wood in the junk pile to make braces for the privacy fence beds to hold them together. We had a good start.
My plan was to build the 10 foot beds from 1 x 12 inch cedar planks. Danny had built our first bed out of them and it was doing great, so we kept building with them. But the supplies for 40 new beds was way out of our price range, so we needed some funding. Mr. Kent and I wrote a letter to some local businesses we thought would care about teaching kids and healthy living. We mailed out 40 letters. A couple of weeks later, Mr. Kent started going door to door to talk to the owners of the businesses about donating. We also contacted the newspaper and asked them to do an article. Most of the companies said no because we are not a public school or non-profit so the donations are not tax deductible. The paper gave no response, so I contacted a different person there, still no response.
A few businesses gave us some money to get started. We got donations from Dr. Weaver, Advantage Control, and Dr. Hoos. We bought the last roll of chain link we needed and a gate and enough landscaping fabric to line the whole space plus each bed for double protection. Mr. Kent insisted. Mr. Kent is my husband, my soul mate and my biggest supporter. I would have NONE of this without him. His support and super hard work help me with everything in my life and I’m super lucky to have him. I call him Mr. Kent because we are children’s pastors and have a daycare in our home and we are ALWAYS with kids, so after years of calling him that, it just stuck. Anyway, back to the first supply run, Mr. Kent had gone to Orchelen’s farm and home to ask for a donation and they said they couldn’t donate, but anything we bought for the project would be 20% off. They also said they had boxes of seeds we could have they didn’t sell the year before. He loaded them up and brought them to me. There were 5 HUGE boxes, over 2000 packets of seeds! What did we do with them? We sorted them and took out whatever we thought we could use, and then we made 5 big mixed boxes for the 5 community gardens in town. My mentor, Doug gave us the contact information and we gave them to the leader at each site. We made 30 “garden in a bags” for people to have. They had a variety of seeds in a Ziploc bag that someone could plant a garden with. And we had a big mixed box of seeds of all kinds that we charted and sent to whoever was interested on Facebook so they could choose seeds they wanted. We gave seeds to all of the daycare families, people in our neighborhood, mailed them to daycares and friends and family around the country, and people picked them up from Mr. Kent at work. After a few months of distributing, we set the last of them in a box at the front desk of the fitness center Mr. Kent works at and the rest were gone within the day. Our seeds are blessing people all over the place as far away as Vegas and all over Oklahoma. She said we could get them again this year. We sure will! Orchelen’s has blessed us tremendously.
As we were looking for funding and mostly being turned down, my friend Jason suggested crowd funding on the internet. We did some research and started a campaign with Indiegogo for three months. Most of my daycare parents contributed and some family members and even a few strangers. We raised enough money for the dirt to fill the beds and some type of material to put between the beds to keep us up out of the mud while we work and to keep down the weeds.
Another daycare dad, Dustin, had a bunch of leftover ends from fence planks that he cut off and some decking. He asked if we wanted them. Of course! There were enough planks to build 10, 2 x 2 beds. That saved us from having to get cedar for 2 of the long beds, more money saved.
We got a contact with the newspaper and my husband talked to him. He was excited to cover the project, but we never heard back from him so we never got any exposure from them. It’s a shame because it is a great community project.
During the time we were going door to door and running our Indiegogo campaign, I also sent letters to online garden companies and wrote any garden grant I could find. Most of them turned me down for the same reasons that the local businesses did, not a non-profit or public school. It doesn’t seem fair to me that barely a profit is not non-profit, but that’s the breaks. Then it happened. I got the call. I received one grant for $800 for wood from the Oklahoma environmental Education Committee. That was the rest of the funding I needed to make my dreams come true and I could buy ALL the wood to build ALL the beds if I used some of my Indiegogo money with it. We were so excited!
I called around to find the best price on the wood and we found a local Hughes Lumber yard here in town that would cut all the wood for us and deliver it for free. Plus they gave me a deal for buying it all at once and took a few cents off per plank to help us with the project. I would recommend everyone in town buying wood from them!
Over the course of a month or two, Mr. Kent and I put together all 40 of the beds of privacy fence, 10 foot planks, and 2 foot planks. We had been working all winter on these beds and spring was getting nearer. We left a space in the center of the garden to make a place of rest. As we were looking at what was left in the junk pile, we had quite a few landscape timbers. I had gotten a book from my daughter that had plans for things made out of what you already have, and there was a really cute herb tower made of landscape timbers I thought would be perfect use of them. Our cutting skills leave, well, a lot to be desired, so I asked Shane, one of my daycare dads to cut the timbers into pieces I needed to build the planter and then all we needed were some long screws. Mr. Kent and I screwed it together in a snap. Then we decided to use some 4 x 4’s to build a pergola on it and top it with a “ladder” made with sticks from a brush pile. It was really fun and we think it looks awesome. We lined it with fabric, filled it with dirt, and planted herbs in it. Then we put a table and some seats next to it to rest on. We also planted some sweet potato vines in the corners to grow up and make a little shade.

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The next thing we needed was dirt to plant in. I called around and looked around at all the prices and sources and choose a Tulsa company called Gemdirt to deliver a load of garden soil. It was a mixture of river bed dirt and sand, composted manure, and compost. I bought the 12 tons that would fit in a truckload and they dumped it in the yard for us. Then we had the problem of how would we move this massive amount of dirt into the beds. So we had a dirt party and invited families to help on a Saturday. Shane and Gena showed up with the boys and in a few hours, we had most of the dirt moved into the beds with wheelbarrows. It was really cumbersome to get the dirt in the beds because the wheelbarrow got stuck on the sides with every dump, but eventually we got it done. It filled all but 5 of the beds we had.

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As we were finishing filling the beds, we could see the weeds growing up between them and pressing the landscape fabric upward. We knew we needed to get the material in between the beds to block out the sun as quickly as possible. I didn’t want to use mulch because of the slope the area is on and the massive rains we get. I figured it would all wash down into the street and cause a big mess, so I needed something heavy. We decided on one inch river gravel. I ordered a load of that with the last of our money. We got 15 tons simply because I had ordered a truck load of pea gravel 15 years before for impact material in my play area and it was 15 tons. I hoped it would be the right amount. We had two more work parties for the daycare to move gravel, one on a Saturday and one on a weeknight. Cindy and the boys, Julie and the girls, Alesa and her boy, and Stacy and the girls came to help. On Saturday we filled the new expansion area, and on Thursday evening we filled the old garden area. We had some gravel leftover so we filled a flower bed. We probably had maybe 3-4 tons left that we gave away. My daycare parents ROCK!

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After the rock was in place, the garden was ready to use. We started planting seeds and seedlings we had grown inside. We have enjoyed it so much and are eating lettuce, radishes, swiss chard, broccoli, herbs, peas and kohlrabi. The kids and I are learning SO much! The expansion lets us grow more variety of food and we feel so blessed to have it! It took a half year of super hard work to build it and a whole community to help, but we did it and we love it!

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What Are My Little Sprouts Growing?

Preschool Gardening, what's growing?

Come on over and take a look!…..

The new garden

The new garden

 

The old garden

The old garden

 

Starting in the front yard, this is our strawberry bed.  Don't be alarmed by the massive amount of weeding I still have to catch up on.  I already know.  :)

Starting in the front yard, this is our strawberry bed. Don’t be alarmed by the massive amount of weeding I still have to catch up on. I already know. 🙂


 

Our blueberry patch

Our blueberry patch

 

The front yard orchard including from left to right, the plum tree, two peach trees and a fig, plus in the foreground there are two apple trees and in this lovely flower planter we have 4 rosemary plants and 8 cayenne pepper plants.

The front yard orchard including from left to right, the plum tree, two peach trees and a fig, plus in the foreground there are two apple trees and in this lovely flower planter we have 4 rosemary plants and 8 cayenne pepper plants.

 

Next the tour of the expansion area. This is a small box of wildflowers to attract pollinators and beneficial insects and our pumpkin patch with a row of spinach in the front.  The spinach will burn up soon so that will give the pumpkins more room to spread, plus they will go up and over the fence.

Next the tour of the expansion area.
This is a small box of wildflowers to attract pollinators and beneficial insects and our pumpkin patch with a row of spinach in the front. The spinach will burn up soon so that will give the pumpkins more room to spread, plus they will go up and over the fence.

 

This is a row of broccoli sharing a bed with some corn that didn't germinate very well.

This is a row of broccoli sharing a bed with some corn that didn’t germinate very well.

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A row of artichokes, a small amaranth, and a row in front of lavender.  Lavender repels many pests such as deer, rabbits, mosquitos, and ticks!

A row of artichokes, a small amaranth, and a row in front of lavender. Lavender repels many pests such as deer, rabbits, mosquitos, and ticks!

 

The corn patch.

The corn patch.

Yellow squash and zucchini.

Yellow squash and zucchini.

Brussell sprouts and corn.  The brussell sprouts should burn up soon and give the corn more room.

Brussell sprouts and corn. The brussell sprouts should burn up soon and give the corn more room.

One of four potato bins.

One of four potato bins.

The watermelon patch with lavender.

The watermelon patch with lavender.

The herbs growing in the pergola.

The herbs growing in the pergola.

Cabbage, broccoli, and cauliflower.

Cabbage, broccoli, and cauliflower.

Sunflowers and marigolds for attracting birds, beneficial insects, and repelling pests.  This is one of several boxes with this.

Sunflowers and marigolds for attracting birds, beneficial insects, and repelling pests. This is one of several boxes with this.

One of two sweet potato bins.

One of two sweet potato bins.

Swiss chard with drying beans in the back up against the fence.  We planted black beans, calypso beans, and pinto beans.

Swiss chard with drying beans in the back up against the fence. We planted black beans, calypso beans, and pinto beans.

We had never tried swiss chard before but thought it was pretty. WE LOVE IT! Yummy!

Another drying bean bed.

Another drying bean bed.

Heirloom tomatoes of different varieties that we grew from seed.

Heirloom tomatoes of different varieties that we grew from seed.

A bed of kale that is taking FOREVER to grow!

A bed of kale that is taking FOREVER to grow!

More sunflowers with nastursiums.  They are beautiful and edible and draw pollinators and beneficials while repelling pests.

More sunflowers with nastursiums. They are beautiful and edible and draw pollinators and beneficials while repelling pests.

Our winter squash bed.  We are growing butternuts and acorn squash.  There is cilantro planted in here and in our summer squash and pumpkin beds to repel squash bugs.

Our winter squash bed. We are growing butternuts and acorn squash. There is cilantro planted in here and in our summer squash and pumpkin beds to repel squash bugs.

More tomatoes interplanted with radishes, lettuce, and carrots.  We also have basil in each of our tomato beds to see if it makes the tomatoes taste amazing like we read it does.

More tomatoes interplanted with radishes, lettuce, and carrots. We also have basil in each of our tomato beds to see if it makes the tomatoes taste amazing like we read it does.

Kohlrabi and more drying beans.  We don't have a trellis for these beans so we planted them with sunflowers so they can use them for support.

Kohlrabi and more drying beans. We don’t have a trellis for these beans so we planted them with sunflowers so they can use them for support.

One of five beds that don't have anything planted yet.  We put extra leaves in them to compost them down while we wait.  We ran out of time and money this spring.

One of five beds that don’t have anything planted yet. We put extra leaves in them to compost them down while we wait. We ran out of time and money this spring.

The okra bed.  Good times!  The kids are super excited about this one!

The okra bed. Good times! The kids are super excited about this one!

The monarch waystation.  Planted with seeds from a kit for giving monarchs a place to rest.

The monarch waystation. Planted with seeds from a kit for giving monarchs a place to rest.

Wildlowers to attract butterflies and a broccoli, dill bed for their caterpillars.

Wildlowers to attract butterflies and a broccoli, dill bed for their caterpillars.

Bulb fennel for butterflies to lay eggs on.

Bulb fennel for butterflies to lay eggs on.

Next, onto the older and smaller garden, we have a wagon of sage and our lettuce bed that has peas on the side and bush green beans growing up in it.  The lettuce will burn up soon.  We have eaten or shared over 25 pounds of lettuce out of this bed.  Crazy!  But fun!

Next, onto the older and smaller garden, we have a wagon of sage and our lettuce bed that has peas on the side and bush green beans growing up in it. The lettuce will burn up soon. We have eaten or shared over 25 pounds of lettuce out of this bed. Crazy! But fun!

The garlic bed with peas growing up the side and a small box of spinach that bolted while we were on vacation, so we are letting it seed out.

The garlic bed with peas growing up the side and a small box of spinach that bolted while we were on vacation, so we are letting it seed out.

Our old pear tree, it has fire blight disease and we can't trim enough of it to save it.  :(  We have harvested hundreds and hundreds of pounds of super delicious pears off this tree over the last 15 years.  So sad.

Our old pear tree, it has fire blight disease and we can’t trim enough of it to save it. 🙁 We have harvested hundreds and hundreds of pounds of super delicious pears off this tree over the last 15 years. So sad.

A barrel of carrots and a barrel of swiss chard with a gerber daisy in the middle.  He he.  Plus a bed of garlic with peas on the side.

A barrel of carrots and a barrel of swiss chard with a gerber daisy in the middle. He he. Plus the bed of garlic with peas on the side.

Our first asparagus bed, it's 2 x 4 feet and there is a barrel of zinnias growing next to it.

Our first asparagus bed, it’s 2 x 4 feet and there is a barrel of zinnias growing next to it.

A barrel of peppers plus a 3 x 10 bed of supposed to be green beans with peas on the side.  But there are some volunteer plants in there.  I'm thinking they could be cucumbers or maybe some kind of squash or melon.  They are flowering so we will see soon enough.

A barrel of peppers plus a 3 x 10 bed of supposed to be green beans with peas on the side. But there are some volunteer plants in there. I’m thinking they could be cucumbers or maybe some kind of squash or melon. They are flowering so we will see soon enough.

A bed of tomatoes with basil and a row of peas on the edge.  Someone around here REALLY likes peas...it's me.  :)

A bed of tomatoes with basil and a row of peas on the edge. Someone around here REALLY likes peas…it’s me. 🙂

One more green bean and pea combo.

One more green bean and pea combo.

The stock tank is growing arugula, some other lettuces, and a brandywine tomato plant.  There is a small 1 x 2 box of lavender and one of spinach in front.

The stock tank is growing arugula, some other lettuces, and a brandywine tomato plant. There is a small 1 x 2 box of lavender and one of spinach in front.

Our chocolate mint.

Our chocolate mint.

Two herb towers.

Two herb towers.

Some miscellaneous wildflowers, lettuce, and lemon grass.

Some miscellaneous wildflowers, lettuce, and lemon grass.

And that’s the grand tour. The largest beds are 3 x 10 feet, narrow so kids can reach the middle. The ones along the fence are 2 feet wide, so they are 2 x 2 or up to 2 x 10. The ones made of salvaged privacy fence are about 6 feet long. If you want to check out how we started the garden, click here.
I hope you enjoy it!

Keeping Planting Times Straight

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I always have a hard time sorting out all of the times for when to grow what, so I made a chart to help. I used information from the OSU extension website and combined it with information from several books and websites until I came up with a range of times I could plant things in my zone, 7a.
The chart is set with the date noted as the first date when planting should be okay. Some years are warmer or colder so the dates won’t be an exact fit, but these are basic guidelines on when to start planting. Most plants can be planted up to a month after the noted date.
I indicates that seeds can be planted in trays indoors, and O indicates that seeds can be planted outdoors. While this chart won’t work for other zones, I hope that I can help someone in my area to keep their dates straight. It has helped me tremendously this year!

PLANTING CHART
1-Jan
Seeds-I Broccoli
Seeds-I Cabbage
Seeds-I Cauliflower

15-Feb
Seeds-I Pepper
Seeds-I Tomato
Seeds-O Carrot
Seeds-O Chard
Seeds-O Kale
Seeds-O Kohlrabi
Seeds-O Lettuce
Sets-O Onion
Seeds-O Peas
Seeds-O Potato
Seeds-O Spinach
Plants Cabbage
Plants Cauliflower
Seeds-I Eggplant
Seeds-I Herbs
Seeds-I Flowers


15-Mar
Crowns Asparagus
Plants Broccoli
Seeds-O Radish
Slips Sweet Potato

15-Apr
Seeds-O Beans
Seeds-O Cucumber
Seeds-O Okra
Seeds-O Pumpkin
Seeds-O Summer Squash
Seeds-O Corn
Seeds-O Flowers
Plants Eggplant
Plants Pepper
Plants Tomato
Plants Herbs
Plants Flowers

1-May
Seeds Cantaloupe
Seeds Winter Squash
Seeds Watermelon
Slips Sweet Potato
Seeds-I Broccoli
Seeds-I Brussell Sprouts
Seeds-I Carrots

15-Jun
Seeds-I Cabbage
Seeds-I Cauliflower
Seeds-I Peas
Seeds-I Radishes
Seeds-I Spinach
Seeds-I Chard
Seeds-I Lettuce

15-Jul
Plants Broccoli
Plants Brussell Sprouts
Plants Carrots
Seeds-I Kale
Seeds-I Kohlrabi

15-Aug
Seeds-O Potato
Plants Cabbage
Plants Cauliflower
Plants Lettuce
Plants Peas
Plants Radish
Plants Chard

1-Sep
Sets Onions
Plants Spinach

20-Sep
Bulbs Garlic

How to Find Peace in the Garden

The kids come back tomorrow. I’ve been off work for a 17 day vacation, the longest I’ve ever been off in my life. I’m searching for peace. Today is Memorial Day, so my mind is full of the chaos in my life right now and my great appreciation for those who gave their lives for my freedom.

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